Poly Kubuntu SCAdian Browncoat goaltender with delusions of grandeur
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Come Back To Me

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I want spicy M&Ms!!!!

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silberbaer
16 days ago
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Spicy M&Ms would be awesome, tho!
New Baltimore, MI
ManBehindThePlan
15 days ago
Mexican Chocolate M&Ms
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Orbital Argument

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"Some people say light is waves, and some say it's particles, so I bet light is some in-between thing that's both wave and particle depending on how you look at it. Am I right?" "YES, BUT YOU SHOULDN'T BE!"
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silberbaer
116 days ago
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He *would* be right by accident, if the sun and the earth were the only two objects in the solar system.
New Baltimore, MI
kfet
116 days ago
Center of the Milky Way is what they mean
silberbaer
116 days ago
@kfet: ...no. That is not what they mean. They are talking about the barycenter. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barycenter_(astronomy)
geordie
116 days ago
I think the truth is somewhere in the middle... it is somewhere between Sagittarius A* and the Solar System's barycenter. And for the humor impaired I agree that Munroe was referring to the barycenter.
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3 public comments
mw
114 days ago
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Frame of reference, frame of reference, frame of reference.
Covarr
114 days ago
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The Earth and the Sun both orbit Venus.
East Helena, MT
JayM
116 days ago
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Ha
Atlanta, GA

When people say “RSS is dead” what they really mean is “we couldn’t figure out a way to monetise RSS.”

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When people say “RSS is dead” what they really mean is “we couldn’t figure out a way to monetise RSS.”

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silberbaer
130 days ago
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Truth.
New Baltimore, MI
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The Origin of the Word “Dude”

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My go-to moniker for other men has long been “dude.” 

“What’s up dude?”

“He’s a good dude.” 

“Check out this dude over here.”

For me, a dude is a cool, laid-back, solid guy.

I’m not alone in my use of dude. It’s been widely employed by my fellow American men for decades. 

But what’s the origin of the word dude?

I took a deep dive into its etymology to find out. 

The Birth of the Dude

Thanks to tireless research by two etymologists, we know the exact date the word dude was coined. 

Robert Sale Hill published a poem in The New York World on January 14, 1883, describing a type of foppish young man living in cities. These young men were overly fastidious about their clothing, professed an interest in avant-garde art, and smoked tiny cigarettes. They were the 19th-century version of the 21st-century hipster. 

And like the hipsters of the 2010s, the dandies of the 1880s were a trope that the public loved to lampoon. 

In the poem that Robert Sale Hill published, he called these fops “dudes.” 

Etymologists Barry Popik and Gerald Cohen theorize that Hill derived the word “dude” from “doodle,” as in “Yankee Doodle Dandy.” The original New England Yankee Doodle, Cohen notes, “was the country bumpkin who stuck a feather in his cap and called it macaroni; i.e., by sticking a feather in his cap, he imagined himself to be fashionable like the young men of his day known as ‘macaronis.'”

Songs, satirical in nature, were written about 19th-century dudes. “Dudish” as the adjective form of dude also came into use in the late 19th century and continued into the 20th. It’s still sometimes used today by older generations to describe a male who’s looking sharp and well-dressed.

After Hill’s poem about dudes was published in 1883, “dude” became the word of the year. Newspapers and magazines started writing about dudes and dude lifestyles. Typically, the aim was to make fun of these dudes as exemplified in another poem published the same year:

“What is the dude, papa?” she said, with sweet, inquiring eyes,
And to the knowledge seeking maid, her daddy thus replies:
A weak mustache, a cigarette, a thirteen button vest,
A curled rim hat—a minaret—two watch chains cross the breast.
A pair of bangs, a lazy drawl, a lackadaisy air;
For gossip at the club or ball, some little past ‘affair.’
Two pointed shoes, two spindle shanks, complete the nether charms;
And follow fitly in the ranks, the two bow legged arms.
An empty head, a buffoon’s sense, a poising attitude;
“By Jove” “Egad!” “But aw” “Immense!” All these make up the dude.

I like the reminder in that last line that youngsters have always had their set of slang that the oldsters found silly. Immense!

Don’t Call Me Dude, Pardner! 

Thanks to newspapers and magazines, “dude” spread across the country. When ranches opened in the American West that catered to wealthy city slicker men from the East who wanted to experience the rough-and-tumble frontier in comfort, they came to be known as “dude ranches.”

Movies with “Dude” in the title, featuring some variation of a citified man transplanted to the West, were very popular up through the mid-20th century.

Being called a “dude” was quite the insult in the West. It meant you didn’t have the grit, toughness, and knowledge to thrive on the frontier. It basically meant you were a soft pretender. When Theodore Roosevelt moved from high society life in New York City to the Dakotas to try his hand at wrangling cattle, he was often called a dude by the veteran, hard-boiled cowboys he encountered. Getting into bar fights and showing his mettle as a rancher quieted, though never entirely quashed, these accusations of dude-dom.

The Modern Dude

For the rest of the 19th century and into the beginning of the 20th, “dude” maintained its meaning as a “well-dressed man.” There were attempts to create a feminine version of dude by creating the word “dudine.” It never stuck.

Prototypical surfer dudes.

As the 20th century progressed, various subcultures in the United States started using dude as a generic moniker for men. In the 1960s, “dude” gained prominence in surfer culture as a synonym for “guy” or “fella.” But it was a certain type of guy or fella, one who embodied the laidback ethos of surfer culture. The feminine “dudette” sort of took off during this time, but like its 19th-century dudine counterpart, it never caught on.

By the 1970s, dude was a common way to describe a laid-back guy with whom you could get along. Basically, this is when it started being used the way that I, and most dudes, use dude today.

The Dude abides.

1998’s The Big Lebowski cemented “dude” as the go-to moniker for chill hombres. Jeff Bridges played “The Dude” and epitomized a laid-back and carefree lifestyle, inspiring the creation of a parody neo-religion called Dudeism. This movement embraces the philosophy of taking it easy and finding contentment in simple pleasures. 

Alright my fellow dudes, now you know where the word dude came from.

It started off as a way to make fun of 19th-century hipsters and turned into a term of endearment.

Long live the dude.

The post The Origin of the Word “Dude” appeared first on The Art of Manliness.

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silberbaer
215 days ago
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So close, but so far. Discussion of the modern dude fails to acknowledge that the term has evolved or is evolving into a gender-neutral term, and that *is* sticking, unlike "dudine" or "dudette".
New Baltimore, MI
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Republican presidential candidate proposes border wall with Canada

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A man, wearing a dark blue suit, white shirt and red tie, speaks at a microphone with his right hand raised in a gesture.

A wall with Canada? The idea came up during a Republican presidential debate, from a candidate insisting his party's border policies aren't tough enough.

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silberbaer
223 days ago
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To keep the liberals from leaving? LOL. I approve. Stay here and fight, cowards.
New Baltimore, MI
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dreadhead
223 days ago
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lol
Vancouver Island, Canada
DMack
222 days ago
are they gonna make us pay for it????

A case for just switching to Coordinated Universal Time (UTC)

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We just changed back our clocks here in the USA from Daylight Saving Time to Standard Time, and frankly I'm sick of this dance. Invariably it means having to find all of the clocks in the house (though fortunately they are becoming fewer and fewer non-internet connected clocks). We have four devices in our kitchen that have clocks on them and frankly only a few of them really need to have clocks. There's only one clock in the kitchen that really matters and it uses the WWVB signal to set itself.

Thing is there's no good reason why anyone should have to reset a clock twice a year. Outside of power outages and drift these things should be a set-and-forget. But we've clearly decided that navigating Byzantine interfaces (which is a whole other topic) to reset something as simple as a clock is something that we're required, nay, expected to do.

I talked with a few friends about this and those conversations sparked an idea that I'm sure others have proposed before. But I think it has some merit, so I will propose it here in the hopes of generating not only discussion but the catalyst for radically rethinking our relationships to our clocks.

Astronomers, Ham radio folks, and the like all use Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) for marking when events occur. This provides an unambiguous reference point for when things are occurring that transcends time zones and other complications of determining when something either happened or should happen. Smart computer folks set the clocks on their servers to UTC, providing a continuous stream in their log files of sequential timestamps (the alternative is having an event that happens at 1:59 a.m. and then finishes at 1:03 a.m.).

By adopting UTC across the board we eliminate the confusion of time zones and provide ourselves with a standardized, unambiguous way of measuring time. No more to we have to concern ourselves with when Europe decides that DST is over, or have to remember which of the 50 states of the USA observes or doesn't observe DST. Heck, we can even thumb our noses at the tinpot dictators that want to have their timezone be :45 or :15 minutes off. That's all fine and good, but the grownups can agree to simply ignore these childish ploys and just move on.

And this gets to the heart of the matter. We've had decades of folks saying that switching to and from DST doesn't really do anything other than cause people problems, from sleep deprivation to interruptions to our circadian rhythms, and the like. We've had many attempts to fix this but somehow other priorities come up and we never get anything done.

Here's the radical suggestion: fuck the politicians and just adopt UTC as a convention anyway.

Sure, it might be painful at first. Having to teach folks that our meeting starts at 19:00 instead of 2 p.m. ET can be confusing, but is it any more confusing than folks who haven't changed their clocks over? And is it less confusing than trying to figure out what time folks should meet if they're in the Pacific, Central, Eastern, Mountain, and Arizona time zones? Heck, many computer folks will add the UTC time to help give folks a clue on what time a meeting should start. What's the difference between saying that you work from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Eastern Time and instead say you're working from 14:00 to 22:00? Sure it looks weird but if you've ever learned hexadecimal you've broken your brain far more with that than what I'm suggesting here.

The beauty is that we can do this now. Normalize using UTC in your daily life. Set your clocks to UTC. Eventually it will seem weird to not use UTC.

I feel this is the way forward instead of waiting for politics to catch up. We've got the tools to make this happen. Why not implement them?

If you're looking for a good tool to help with this I can recommend Every Time Zone. You can also add UTC to most calendar applications and clocks.

Stop waiting for the world to catch up. Let's fix this once and fix it right.

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silberbaer
227 days ago
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I approve this message
New Baltimore, MI
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